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Selfseeds Caball (Cable & Ball) Exercises www.Selfseeds...

Caball Exercises
Photo Credit: Heather Marsh

Caball (Cable & Ball) Exercises were created from a desire to make exercising integrative, challenging, sensing, and dynamic.  It is easy to become complacent while exercising with the number of repetitions and a familiarity to a routine that develops quickly.  The self discipline is to stay alert, attentive, and fresh with each movement, so injuries are prevented, alignment is monitored, and connectivity from the core outwards is initiated.  From my past as a professional rider and serious ballroom dancer, I learned to move and focus on this inner awareness, but for a lot of people this is an unknown or a challenge of  “how to.”  The Caball exercises create an instant awareness, since they require balance and inner stability with all of the moving parts.

My hope was to develop exercises that created a whole body workout with body, mind, and spirit.  I wanted fitness to take-on an aliveness/fun factor instead of drudgery. The Caball exercises are considered advanced, but they can also be modified by first doing the exercises flat-footed and then moving to a half round.  Also, one should experiment with sitting and kneeling on the balance ball before taking on the Caball Exercises.

Integrative exercises involve lots of moving parts and how they must work together. I really like how they give you a whole body workout, coordination challenge, inner awareness, timing, fitness, flexibility, weight distribution, balance and presence. Making it all fun and functional. The cable allows for dynamic control of the core through the appendages from start to finish. The ball adds extra awareness, core engagement, and balance. All of it is alive!
Caball (cable and ball) exercises developed out of the desire to bring more movement, challenge, and balance to integrative exercises. As a dancer and athlete, I wanted to find a way to get fit and have fun. Caball requires a focus on inner core use and awareness with the added challenges of angles and rotational contact points that aren’t always stable. You are the stability and the rest is in controlled motion–just like dancing.
Integrative exercises involve lots of moving parts and how they must work together. I really like how they give you a whole body workout, coordination challenge, inner awareness, timing, fitness, flexibility, balance and presence. Caball is a combination of cable + ball exercises. Making it all fun.
Integrative exercises require mind and body coordination, since there are multiple dynamics involved. Inner core engagement and control are the cornerstone to balance, stability, rhythm, weight distribution, and flexibility. The exercises are designed to be fun and engaging–the adult jungle gym while getting functionally fit!
Integrative exercises involve lots of moving parts and how they must work together. I really like how they give you a whole body workout, coordination challenge, inner awareness, timing, fitness, flexibility, and presence. Caball is a combination of cable + ball exercises. Making it all fun.
Caball (cable and ball) exercises developed out of the desire to bring more movement, challenge, and balance to integrative exercises. As a dancer and athlete, I wanted to find a way to get fit and have fun. Caball requires a focus on inner core use and awareness with the added challenges of angles and rotational contact points that aren’t always stable. You are the stability and the rest is in controlled motion–just like dancing.
Category: Balance, Fitness, Flexibility, Integrative Band, Selfseeds, Weight Distribution
Tag: balance, caball, cable pulls, core use, exercise ball, fitness, flexibility, integrative exercises, Selfseeds, weight distribution, whole body workout

Selfseeds Integrative Exercises: Front-to-Back (Caball) www...

Photo credit: Heather Marsh

The integrative exercises challenges your mind and body which supports functional training.  Part of the challenge equation is working out the right amount of weight, so you can move in a controlled-engaged way without losing your balance on the ball.  Looking for the limits, but not going over.  There are no fixed points to leverage against, so you have to work with sensing/feeling your way in the exercise.

Category: Balance, Fitness, Flexibility, Integrative Band, Rhythm, Selfseeds, Weight Distribution
Tag: balance, caball, fitness, functional training, integrative exercises, Selfseeds, weight distribution

Inspirational Quotes

Cheering!!  Let’s hear it for inspirational quotes!

Fitness Quotes: Sayings To Get You Moving
By The Huffington Post News Editors
Despite everything we know about the benefits of exercise, it’s still easy to make excuses to skip a workout. You’ve probably heard them all, and tried out at least a few: I’m too tired, I don’t have the time, I’m not good at it.

Category: Balance, Fitness, Flexibility, Integrative Band, Selfseeds, Weight Distribution
Tag: balance ball, cable pulls, creative fitness, integrative exercises, weight distribution

Introduction to the Selfseeds Program (video) www.Selfseeds....

Here it is!!  A clearer outline of the program, thoughts, and components!  Enjoy!  Please don’ t hesitate with any feedback.

Category: Balance, Emotions, Fitness, Flexibility, Integrative Band, Nutrition, Partnering, Personalize 5, Rhythm, Selfseeds, Stillness, Weight Distribution
Tag: balance, fitness, flexibility, integrative band, nutrition, partnering, personalized, rhythm, Selfseeds, stillness, weight distribution

Looking At Your Personal Building Blocks

Looking at your Building Blocks

How we move our weight through space is often overlooked.  We are a body and we want to move from point A to point B.  First on the list is we get there, but how often do we notice how we got there?  When we don’t have impediments to our movement it is even easier to overlook the how.  It never hurts to check-in with symmetry, range of motion, swing of limbs, etc.  Since I am walking a lot, I noticed that I need to consciously switch which hand or shoulder I am carrying my tote bag.  My left shoulder is more consistently hiked up from favoring carrying items on that side.  Similarly, I try to take a look at my shoes (gym and hiking) to see how I am wearing the tread or if I need to replace them because the worn out tread is creating additional asymmetry.

The following article is Tai Chi in words.  Lovely flow and feeling to the use of words.  Tai Chi can be a great way to look at weight distribution, integrative movement, balance, timing, and more.  Enjoy!

Tai Chi Chuan and the Art of Balance | Tai Chi Classes NYC

Tai Chi Class

Welcome to WholenessInMotion. Tai chi is a whole body and mind exercise that combines meditation, martial art and health tonic in one. This particular form is the Yang style, 37 posture short form as taught by Prof. Cheng Man-ch’ing. This fascinating and intricate exercise has many benefits and just about anyone can practice it.
 Tai Chi Chuan and the Art of Balance
Posted By Tom Daly

Tai Chi Chuan and the Art of Balance.

Of course, are we talking about physical balance or mental balance? In tai chi, both are developed, but neither is guaranteed.

That being said, tai chi is well known for helping with physical balance and studies have backed up this statement. But why is this so?

It intrigues me that the tai chi solution to balance has nothing to do with holding yourself together on top of the ground. Tai chi is about letting go and sinking into the ground. Tai chi has nothing to do with a rigid center line that rises up from the feet into the head. It has more to do with the circumference – the outer circle of your body – and letting that circumference be in harmony with itself and in harmony with its surroundings.

When you study tai chi, initially one element is brought forth – a soft upright quality of the body. “Body upright!” we are told. Another way it is approached is letting the spine hang from the top of the cervical vertebrae.

This “hanging” allows relaxation to take over and to let the pelvic bones anchor the torso around a column like or pillar like sense of the upper body. This top section then rests on the hip joints which in turn rest on the legs on the feet on the ground. So the hanging and resting quality in tai chi lets the weight fall into the ground through the body, unimpeded. The joints open and are encouraged to be relaxed and flexible.

At the same time, it allows other muscles to relax and to let you have enough mind left over to feel the outer edges of the column of your torso. This is actually not a literal sense of the torso, but more of relating the front with the back of a circular column, and the right with the left sides of this imaginary column. Later, we extend this to include the lower half of the body and finally we grow from a column to an oval or circular ball like sense of the body.

By being a ball, we roll along the ground as opposed to sort of clomping along. We become smoother. (Observe that a ball doesn’t really balance on the ground, it just IS with the ground.)

Note the progression above. We go from hanging from above to relaxation to a sense of being a column to the sense of being a ball. This has nothing to do with holding yourself up rigidly to maintain some sort of balance.

The tai chi form offers plenty of moments of challenge in terms of balance when we move one foot off the ground to land somewhere else. By being relaxed and open and connected to the ground, we learn real balance. At these particular moments, the training emphasizes being on the foot where the weight actually is and by not lurching or falling onto the foot that is finding a new place to land. This is the opposite of walking where we really do take advantage of falling onto the next foot as we move forward and catching ourselves as we move forward.

Your body is like a scale. One foot connects more and more into the ground where the weight currently is, the other foot lightly lands – no weight – onto the ground it plans to move towards. So there is a moment where you are ready to shift your weight forward, but you haven’t made any physical commitment in that direction, at least for a brief moment. The scale is all on one side of the fence preparing to move to the other side.

We spend a great deal of time working at this precarious place because we are training ourselves to create a new habit. We no longer perch on top of the ground, but we now sink into the ground and use the ground to help stabilize and relax our bodies, utilizing several new tools to assist in the process. Subtly, you relax the upper body to use the ground to find stability.

Another aspect here, somewhat hidden, is that by working this way, we are encouraged to put our awareness into the body. Our mind is not dwelling on some idea, plan, past annoyance and any other distraction. This new kind of balance is so mentally challenging and oddly satisfying that you absolutely have to be very aware of what is going on within the body itself. A new habit is being formed – that of having your mind in your body.

In tai chi training, we return again and again and again to feeling what is going on inside of our physical selves. To have a special exercise where this is required is a huge benefit.

Yet another aspect is that since tai chi is also a martial art, your awareness has to include your surroundings, even those areas that you don’t see with your eyes. You learn to feel your surroundings. Like an octopus with many tentacles, your awareness expands to include the whole space. We are developing a large inclusive way of perceiving the world.

One could argue that you don’t need tai chi to put your mind in your body. That’s true, but I would argue that by practicing tai chi, you have a tool that gently encourages you to put your mind in your body. Otherwise, most likely you wouldn’t want to be bothered. And since practicing tai chi contains many other benefits, you get more “bang!” for the time spent studying and practicing.

I mentioned mental balance. While this is a tough act to achieve, I’ll briefly state that I believe that putting your mind into your body is a good place to begin if mental balance is an issue. This is not the whole answer of course. It seems to help, though like any human endeavor there are many ways to defeat even the best of training activities.

Balance is a worthy practice, a challenge, rewarding and endlessly fascinating.

Tai chi really helps you get there.

Category: Selfseeds, Weight Distribution
Tag: alignment, How are you moving through space, swing of limbs, tai chi, weight distribution

Fitness designed for function

Creative training and look at all the supporting tools in the background

Functional fitness–what a great idea, but it shows how far out of alignment are lives have taken us if we are relearning function in our adult physical form.  It makes sense now that people have jobs requiring sitting at a desk, driving a car instead of walking, hiring a gardener to take of the yard, or a house cleaner to beautify the inside of the house.

During my first trip to India, I joined a power yoga class with a group of local women.  My host explained that many woman wouldn’t have the time or energy to participate, since they are doing their chores by hand.  Now living in India, I can relate to her words, but at the time it created a momentary pause in my perception of household chores.  We have so many modern conveniences that I have had to relearn hand washing skills, using a clothes line, etc.–bending down to the bucket, reaching up to the clothes line–all good functional, practical fitness activities.

functional fitness hanging up clothes

On that note, when you exercise making it functional is a great focus.  One of my early sports mentors always focused on cross coordination,  range of motion, and rotation as a way to keep the body “alive” and pliable.  It sounds like functional training from 15 or more years ago, so enjoy reading the article to get fresh ideas for your training workout.

Formulating functional fitness for everyday people

 

Formulating functional fitness for everyday people 

By Dorene Internicola

NEW YORK (Reuters) -A mother-to-be hoists a rubber cylinder overhead. A 70-year-old balances on a wobble board and a firefighter grips a medicine ball while lunging across the gym floor.

Called functional training, workouts mirroring the activities of daily life have become a cornerstone of personal training sessions and group fitness classes, even if daily life can encompass anything from lifting a baby to scaling a burning building.

“Functional fitness has moved beyond the trend stage, and is simply one of the driving forces for many of the 50 million health club members,” said Meredith Poppler of IHRSA (International Health, Racquet and Sportsclub Association).

It’s basically exercise aimed at improving the quality of life and movement.

“Functional fitness is exercise that mimics everyday tasks,” explained Frank Salzone, a trainer with the Equinox chain of fitness centres. “I always put my personal clients through functional training.”

Salzone noted that while functional fitness has always been around, it has gained steam since the image of a healthy body shifted away from the bulkier body builder to today’s leaner look.

“Body builders tend to use power moves, power lifting. They only do three or four repetitions at a time,” he explained. “Functional training uses higher repetitions with fewer breaks so it boosts cardio vascular levels as well as strength training.”

Bootcamp classes, which use light weights or one’s own body weight, he said are among the most popular functional fitness classes.

“You can also use medicine balls, resistance balls, dumbbells,” he said. “Any tool can be used in a group fitness setting given the right instruction and set up.”

Among the newer tools in the functional fitness arsenal is the ViPR (Vitality, Performance, Reconditioning), a rubber cylinder with cutout handles designed to be carried, dragged, flipped, thrown, stepped on and rolled over.

It’s functional, according to Salzone, because you can adjust your workout to your goals, “whether you’re a marathoner, looking to gain lean mass or just have an overall full body workout.”

Life Fitness, the Illinois-based equipment manufacturer, has put together functional training manuals specific to sports, such as football, basketball and baseball, as well as programs for seniors, youth and firefighters, according to spokesperson Heather Sieker.

“Functional training is basically a type of training that improves function,” Sieker said. “It could be function in a specific sport, work, or even function in daily living.”

Even absolute beginners can perform functional movements, she said, but they should ask the guidance of a fitness professional to start.

“Then as they progress they might incorporate more and more advanced movements,” she said.

Salzone recommends starting out with three or four functional training sessions a week, then adding a day as you build strength.

“You should be doing four to five times a week for a full body functional workout,” he said. “If you do these workouts nonstop, you’ll be incorporating your cardio as well.”

Salzone said you can define fitness in many ways.

“My definition of fit is having a healthy, well-working body where you’re able to do functional movements without injuring yourself,” he said. “If you’re running for a bus, you want your heart rate to be able to go higher without risk.”

Category: Fitness, Selfseeds, Weight Distribution
Tag: creative, fitness, flexible, functional, practical, weight distribution